Wekelijkse Lezingen & Films

Het NVIC organiseert wekelijks lezingen (op donderdag) en filmavonden (op zondag). Wij hopen velen van jullie te mogen ontvangen!

NVICinema

Op zondagavonden presenteert het NVIC de NVICinema. We brengen een divers programma van Nederlandse of Vlaamse films, Egyptische klassiekers, maar ook eigentijdse Egyptische films en korte films van jonge ontluikende regisseurs, allemaal met Engelse ondertitels. We zetten ook de levendige discussies van vorig jaar verder samen met de regisseurs van de films.

De filmavonden beginnen om 19.30u stipt. De deuren gaan om 19u open.

Wegens de feestdagen zijn er in December geen filmavonden meer. We wensen iedereen een fijne Kerst en alvast een gelukkig Nieuwjaar! We kijken er naar uit om iedereen weer welkom te heten voor de nieuwe filmreeks in januari!


Lezingen

Het NVIC organiseert wekelijks op donderdag lezingen over een brede waaier aan onderwerpen. De lezingen starten stipt om 18u (de deuren gaan om 17u30 open). 

Het jaar loopt ten einde en zo ook ons lezingenprogramma. In December zullen er geen lezingen meer zijn. We wensen iedereen een fijne Kerst en alvast een gelukkig Nieuwjaar! We kijken er naar uit om iedereen weer welkom te heten voor de nieuwe lezingenreeks in januari!  

Raadpleeg onze Engelstalige website voor een overzicht van het programma. Gelieve er rekening mee te houden dat de plaatsen beperkt zijn. De lezingen beginnen zoals gepland en laatkomers worden niet meer binnengelaten. Na de lezingen wordt er een receptie aangeboden in de hal van ons instituut.

Raadpleeg de website en onze Facebookpagina in het geval van wijzigingen en voor bijkomende informatie over sprekers, onderwerpen en tijden.     
 

The Ways of Wanderers: Routes and Their Uses in Kharga Oasis

Thursday, 12 January

Salima Ikram

In the early literature of Egyptology, Egypt was presented as an isolated area, whose separation from other cultures was largely responsible for the Egyptian’s retention of their traditions and technologies, both in their daily and religious life. This view changed somewhat, particularly due to the scholarship of the 1960s onward. However, most of the attention with regard to Egypt’s contacts with other areas has focused on the Levant, Greece, Asia Minor, and Nubia, with some attention paid to Libya in the northwest. However, the southwest, the area of the Eastern Sahara (Egypt’s Western Desert) received the least amount of attention. In recent years, this has changed, and a plethora of routes and tracks have been identified in the Western Desert that attests to an active intercourse with far flung lands and cultures in this direction. Portions of these long-distance tracks traverse Kharga Oasis, and these, the reasons for their existence, and the activities that occurred on them and in these areas are the focus of this talk.

The number of seats is limited so coming in time is advised. We open our doors at 5:30 and close them at 6:15 or earlier in case the lecture room has reached its full capacity.


Pots and Provisions at Wadi el-Hudi: Middle Kingdom Pottery at Mining Settlements in the Eastern Desert

Thursday, 19 January

Meredith Brand

The Wadi el-Hudi Expedition has conducted surveys and excavations in the Eastern Desert at several Middle Kingdom settlements and associated amethyst mines. The pottery at these sites provides a lot of information on how miners and workmen at Wadi el-Hudi lived, worked, and ate. This talk will also explore the Nubian and Egyptian pottery at the site to address questions of the identity of the workmen at these sites. The pottery also informs on the supply chain of goods and materials to Wadi el-Hudi and suggests how the state organized provisions for mining expeditions.

The number of seats is limited so coming in time is advised. We open our doors at 5:30 and close them at 6:15 or earlier in case the lecture room has reached its full capacity.


Recent Work in Theban Tomb 16

Thursday, 26 January

Suzanne Onstine

This lecture will summarize the work of the University of Memphis mission to Theban Tomb 16, belonging to Panehsy in the Dra Abu el Naga section of the Theban necropolis. Epigraphy, archaeology, and bioarchaeology have been the focus of our work since 2008. Dr. Suzanne Onstine will present the conclusions made regarding the dating of the tomb and the secondary burials, and a preliminary analysis of some of the human remains.

The number of seats is limited so coming in time is advised. We open our doors at 5:30 and close them at 6:15 or earlier in case the lecture room has reached its full capacity.


 

An Archive of Feelings: Mental Health and The Politics of Emotions in Post-2011 Egypt

Thursday, 2 February

Dina Makram-Ebeid

This talk looks at the place of emotions in public life and particularly in the world of politics and revolutions. It emerges from the frustration around the neglect of emotions and its catastrophic effect, which is articulated by Judith Butler when she asks “What, politically, might be made from grief besides a cry for war?" The talk emerges from a commitment to not shove emotions as marginal to political work. Instead by including emotions and affect, we shall explore alternative ways of writing and doing politics that challenge the modernist separation of mind and body, reason, and desire/emotions and the sexist valuation of “rationality” over “emotions” which has shaped both conservative and progressive political discourses.

This talk is inspired by enquiries such as that of Sara Ahmed’s (The Cultural Politics of Emotion), of Ann Cvetkovich (Depression: A public feeling; An Archive of Feelings) that have taken the task of understanding “bad feelings” and how they relate to politics seriously. The talk proposes a project that takes on the suggestion of Cvetkovich on working towards an Archive of Feelings that captures the diverse ways people feel and express emotions that allow for a moving away from the medicalisation and standardisation of feelings. In so doing the talk also re-thinks how gender appears in the project, in the least through an examination that identifies political histories of pain and trauma that enable alternative possibilities for healing. But also through a rethinking of the meanings of hope and the ideas of utopia.

Dina Makram-Ebeid is an anthropologist interested in social and ecological justice. The intimate discussions she had with friends, comrades and strangers about the psychological states they experienced recently in Egypt inspired her in 2016 to formulate two thematic courses, one on madness at CILAS (Cairo 'Initiative' of Liberal Arts and Sciences) and another on the experience of confinement at the AUC The American University in Cairo. This interest in mental health journeys thus encouraged her to explore creative and collective paths to making meaning of “political depressions”. She hopes to share some of the deliberations and discussions that took places during both classes in Cairo and that lead to the idea of an Archive of Feelings. By continuing to merge anthropological work with art-based initiatives, Dina aspires to create media for people to connect, explore outlawed emotions and express the rich human experience.

The number of seats is limited so coming in time is advised. We open our doors at 5:30 and close them at 6:15 or earlier in case the lecture room has reached its full capacity.


The Writings of Ahmed Lutfi el-Sayed Pasha (1872-1963) on Ancient Egypt

Thursday, 9 February

Ahmed Mekawy Ouda

Ahmed Lutfi el-Sayed was an Egyptian intellectual, anti-colonial activist and the first director of Cairo University. He is widely considered one of the most influential scholars in the history of Egypt. His writings on Ancient Egypt were produced during an era when the contributions of leading Egyptian academic figures were sadly overlooked. Egyptian academics, largely marginalized within their own field, struggled to obtain positions whilst foreign Egyptologists actively excavated and governed the direction that the development of Egypt's heritage would take. The writings of Ahmed Lutfi el-Sayed implored Egyptians to visit pharaonic, Islamic, and Greek Roman archaeological sites and embrace the unique aspects of their culture and heritage. He used these values to evoke the spirit of Egyptian nationalism which could be used for the development and the progress of their country in order to free Egypt from the British occupation. This talk will examine the content and context of his writings in a tumultuous period of Egypt's history.

The number of seats is limited so coming in time is advised. We open our doors at 5:30 and close them at 6:15 or earlier in case the lecture room has reached its full capacity.




Death and the City: The Cemeteries of Amarna in Their Urban Context

Thursday, 16 February

Anna Stevens

Burial grounds are increasingly being considered as components of lived urban environments in the past. This talk will consider how the ancient Egyptian city of Akhetaten (modern Amarna), built by king Akhenaten (c. 1349–1332BC), was constructed and experienced as a space inhabited both by the living and the dead. Drawing upon results from ongoing excavations at the Amarna cemeteries, it will explore how the settlement and its burial grounds relate to one another, and how the nature of burial landscapes and the need to maintain reflexive relationships between the living and the dead in the midst of a changing religious milieu contributed to the unique character of Akhetaten as a city. It asks what kind of city Akhetaten was, and what it was like to live through the Amarna period.

The number of seats is limited so coming in time is advised. We open our doors at 5:30 and close them at 6:15 or earlier in case the lecture room has reached its full capacity.




Kafr Hassan Dawood and the Origins of the Egyptian State

Thursday, 23 February

Fekri Hassan

The emergence of Egyptian civilization was the outcome of a series of events that began as early as global warming ending the Last Glacial period was set in motion. Responding to the severe fluctuations and devastating reversal to colder episodes, prehistoric communities all over the world began to develop mechanisms to overcome food shortages and unpredictability. One of the world-changing responses was the adoption of cultivating cereals and keeping livestock by 10,000 years ago in the Levant, Iraq, Iran, and Turkey. In Egypt reliance on fishing provided a viable alternative.

By 8200 years ago, an abrupt cold event was followed by a series of great variability. These climatic eventualities led to the spread of herders and cultivators into the Egyptian Sahara and the Red Sea Coast. By 7000 years ago, warm and drier desert conditions prevailed in northern Egypt prompting desert communities to settle along the Nile Valley along the Delta margins. However, early Nile Valley and Delta settlers began to experience frequent episodes of famine and social conflicts due to changing volume of Nile Flood due to climatic fluctuations. Occasional famines and conflicts were overcome through inter-group alliances and political integration culminating in the emergence of a unified Egyptian state by about 5000 years ago.

This lecture traces the impact of climate change on the origins of agriculture and movements into the Nile Valley and the Delta of prehistoric desert communities. Once in the Nile Valley, Prof. Fekri Hassan shall illustrate how the Nile Valley dwellers overcame chaos by establishing an orderly state society.

Prof. Fekri Hassan has over 40 years of experience in the field of Archaeology and Anthropology. He is emeritus Petrie Professor of Archaeology at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. Since 2009 he has been director of the Cultural Heritage Program at the French University in Egypt. Professor Hassan was the editor of the African Archaeology Review, and serves on the editorial board of many journals ranging from Holocene, to Water Policy, and Antiquity. He has been elected Vice-President of The World Archaeological Congress and is the honorary President of the Egyptian Cultural Heritage Organization (ECHO).

Professor Hassan has devoted his time over the last 15 years to tackling issues of cultural heritage management. He is director of a geoarchaeological investigation of Fayoum and is still engaged in numerous expeditions to the Egyptian Sahara, Upper Egypt, Fayoum, Sinai, the Red Sea Hills and East Delta in Egypt. He has also worked in Algeria, Jordan, and Nubia.

The number of seats is limited so coming in time is advised. We open our doors at 5:30 and close them at 6:15 or earlier in case the lecture room has reached its full capacity.


 
Laatst Gewijzigd: 23-01-2017